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Citizen calls for plans to build “symbol of Oshawa”

Resident: Council should build structure to honour city's centennial in 2024

Resident Greg Milosh says the city should start putting money away now in order to build a monument much like Sudbury's Big Nickel or Wawa's giant Canada Goose to mark Oshawa's 100th birthday. Currently, the city plans to have $100,000 saved for the celebration in 2024.

Resident Greg Milosh says the city should start putting money away now in order to build a monument much like Sudbury’s Big Nickel or Wawa’s giant Canada Goose to mark Oshawa’s 100th birthday. Currently, the city plans to have $100,000 saved for the celebration in 2024.

By Joel Wittnebel/The Oshawa Express

One Oshawa resident is turning his eyes to the future and wants councillors to do the same.

Greg Milosh, speaking to both the development services committee and council, pushed for the city to begin planning some kind of landmark or structure to celebrate Oshawa’s 100th birthday in March 2024.

“We have only one chance to celebrate our city’s 100th birthday in an appropriate and significant manner,” Milosh told committee members.

He noted something much better than an “ephemeral same-day celebration” was needed to honour the anniversary.

“I believe that a much more significant and long-lasting recognition of this unique and once-in-a-lifetime occasion is justified,” he says.

Milosh pointed to the Big Nickel in Sudbury and the giant Canada Goose in Wawa as potential examples of what Oshawa could plan for. He added he hopes the structure could become the “symbol of Oshawa,” with perhaps the city’s history with the auto sector or the origins of its name be used as inspiration.

He suggested the cost of such a project would be between $1 million and $5 million.

The idea did not seem to hold water with many councillors, who offered no feedback on the presentation or the idea, following which Milosh took his idea to council chambers.

“With the significant nature of my proposal, I expected my presentation would have generated comments and questions from committee members and the mayor. Unfortunately, there were none. No one said a word. In my opinion, this is unacceptable,” Milosh said.

Currently, the city is putting away $10,000 annually with the plan of having $100,000 in a reserve fund to be used for the celebration come 2024.

Following a brief discussion, Councillor Amy McQuaid-England suggested that perhaps, along with Milosh’s proposal to work with the Robert McLaughlin Gallery on the project, that the university and colleges could be involved as well. She then put forward a motion, seconded by Councillor John Neal, that the idea be referred to staff for a further report on possibilities and other steps moving forward.

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